Aerospace & Defense

  • July 18, 2024

    GAO Refuses To Disturb $3.8B Air Force Contract Award

    The U.S. Government Accountability Office backed the Air Force's decision to award a $3.85 billion contract for support services at a Tennessee base, rejecting a challenge lodged by a competing contractor, a decision made public Thursday showed.

  • July 18, 2024

    More Novel Protests May Follow OTA Jurisdiction Ruling

    A Court of Federal Claims decision asserting jurisdiction over certain disputes stemming from the U.S. government's authority to mimic commercial purchasing practices could open the door for more novel protests challenging the use of that authority.

  • July 18, 2024

    SpaceX Tells 5th Circ. It Will Win Challenge To NLRB Structure

    The Fifth Circuit should block claims that SpaceX violated labor law from proceeding before the National Labor Relations Board because the company has a good shot at winning its constitutional challenge to the agency's structure, SpaceX argued.

  • July 18, 2024

    Menendez Appeal Could Make Hay From Bribery Case Law

    Sen. Robert Menendez's planned "aggressive" appeal will almost certainly include broadsides against his novel foreign-agent conviction and attempt to capitalize on the U.S. Supreme Court's proven appetite for bribery cases, experts say.

  • July 18, 2024

    BAE Gets Wage Claims Cut From Engineer's Retaliation Suit

    A former engineer for BAE Systems adequately alleged that it understood he was raising concerns about his overtime pay when it chose to fire him, a Maryland federal magistrate judge ruled, keeping alive the ex-worker's retaliation claim while cutting his wage claims against the U.S. Navy contractor.

  • July 18, 2024

    Feds Say Loper Bright Not Relevant In IVF Policy Suit

    The U.S. Department of Defense urged a New York federal court Thursday to throw out a nonprofit's lawsuit challenging its in vitro fertilization coverage policy for service members, countering the group's argument that the agency can't shake the suit because the U.S. Supreme Court upended Chevron deference.

  • July 18, 2024

    SolarWinds Beats Most Claims In SEC's Data Breach Suit

    A New York federal judge on Thursday delivered a heavy blow to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's case against software developer SolarWinds Corp. by dismissing substantial portions of the lawsuit, including claims that the company committed securities fraud by minimizing the severity of a state-sponsored attack on its flagship product.

  • July 17, 2024

    Defense Contractor CAE Faces Investor Suit Over Overruns

    Defense contractor CAE was hit with a proposed shareholder class action alleging it misrepresented major incurred costs related to contracts the company entered into before the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • July 17, 2024

    Special Counsel To Appeal Ax Of Trump Classified Docs Case

    Special Counsel Jack Smith told a Florida federal court Wednesday that he was challenging U.S. District Judge Aileen Cannon's order earlier this week tossing the classified documents criminal case against Donald Trump, according to a notice of appeal.

  • July 17, 2024

    Firm Can't Dodge Veteran's Class Claims Over Fees

    A North Carolina federal judge has refused to throw out a proposed class action alleging that a consulting firm charged veterans millions in illegal fees, saying the suit needs more litigation before a dismissal is considered.

  • July 17, 2024

    Watchdog Says Army Didn't Properly Review Ukraine Invoices

    A U.S. Department of Defense watchdog has criticized the U.S. Army for failing to properly oversee a task order supporting maintenance and repair of equipment for Ukraine, saying the Army allowed $20 million in contractor invoices to be paid without checking they were legitimate.

  • July 17, 2024

    Russian Gets 3 Years For Smuggling US Military Technology

    A Russian national was sentenced to three years in prison Wednesday by a New York federal judge after admitting to scheming to smuggle U.S. microelectronics used in military settings.

  • July 17, 2024

    Judge Trims Sentence For Crypto Expert Who Aided N. Korea

    A New York federal judge has cut seven months from the sentence of a computer expert convicted of furthering North Korean blockchain development in light of recently revised U.S. sentencing guidelines.

  • July 17, 2024

    6th Circ. Skeptical About Nixing Diver's Harassment Verdict

    The Sixth Circuit appeared inclined Wednesday to uphold a $58,000 verdict awarded to a commercial diver who accused an environmental cleanup company of subjecting her to harassment and belittlement, with several judges expressing doubt about superseding the jury's conclusion. 

  • July 17, 2024

    New Mexico Adds Superfund Claims To PFAS Suit Against US

    New Mexico is expanding its lawsuit against the federal government over costs related to cleaning up forever chemicals near military sites by utilizing a new rule listing the substances as hazardous under the Superfund law.

  • July 16, 2024

    Feds Say Ex-CIA Analyst Secretly Worked For Korea

    Federal prosecutors have accused a former Central Intelligence Agency analyst and prominent foreign policy expert of advocating for South Korea's policy positions and working with its spies in exchange for luxury goods, "high-priced dinners" and other gifts, according to an indictment unsealed Tuesday in New York federal court.

  • July 16, 2024

    Claims Court Can Decide Follow-On Other Transaction Deal

    A Court of Federal Claims judge ruled that her court has jurisdiction to hear a dispute over a contract following on from a U.S. Army Other Transaction Authority agreement, but threw out the case anyway because the protester let a required federal registration lapse.

  • July 16, 2024

    Musk Says X, SpaceX Moving To Texas Over Calif. Gender Law

    Elon Musk took to X Tuesday to announce he will be moving the headquarters of the social media company and his astronautics company, SpaceX, out of California to Texas, after Golden State Gov. Gavin Newsom signed a bill that bars policies mandating that teachers notify parents about students' gender identity.

  • July 16, 2024

    KBR Whistleblower Loses $1.1M Settlement Award At 5th Circ.

    The Fifth Circuit on Tuesday reversed a KBR Inc. whistleblower's $1.1 million share of a False Claims Act settlement over alleged Iraq War contract kickbacks, agreeing with the federal government that the now-deceased whistleblower's estate deserved nothing since none of his claims were settled.

  • July 16, 2024

    3 Reasons Why 2nd Menendez Bribery Case Was The Charm

    Nearly seven years after the government's first bribery case against longtime U.S. Sen. Robert Menendez collapsed in a hung jury, prosecutors avenged that loss Tuesday by sealing a conviction on a new round of corruption charges.

  • July 16, 2024

    Trump Special Prosecutor Ruling Could Find Favor On Appeal

    When U.S. District Judge Aileen Cannon dismissed the criminal case against former President Donald Trump in Florida over what she said was an unconstitutional appointment of a special prosecutor, she staked out a position that few other jurists have taken, but that could find support among some appellate judges, experts said.

  • July 16, 2024

    Kaspersky To End US Operations After Commerce Dept.'s Ban

    A Russian cybersecurity and antivirus provider will begin closing U.S. operations and laying off workers Sunday, after the U.S. Department of Commerce banned it from selling its products in the U.S. or to U.S. citizens.

  • July 16, 2024

    SpaceX Loses Bid To Block Rival's Earth Station Renewals

    The Federal Communications Commission denied SpaceX's request to reconsider the agency's renewal of licenses for three earth stations from satellite communications company DBSD Corp., saying in a new order that SpaceX showed little to support its claim that DBSD was using "obstructionist" tactics to interfere with SpaceX operations.

  • July 16, 2024

    DC Circ. Says Iraq Immune To $120M Contract Row

    A D.C. Circuit panel on Tuesday threw out a $120 million judgment levied against Iraq for its refusal to pay a Pennsylvania defense contractor for rebuilding the country's military equipment, ruling after more than a decade of litigation that Iraq is immune from the jurisdiction of the U.S. courts.

  • July 16, 2024

    Ex-Mozambique Official Accused Of $2B Fraud As Trial Opens

    Federal prosecutors told a Manhattan jury Tuesday that Mozambique's former finance minister took $7 million in bribes in a "corrupt" plot to enrich himself and defraud investors after $2 billion in state-backed development projects flopped.

Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    Trump Immunity Ruling Upends Our Constitutional Scheme

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    The U.S. Supreme Court’s Trump v. U.S. decision elevates the president to imperial status and paves the way for nearly absolute presidential immunity from potential criminal prosecutions — with no constitutional textual support, says Paul Berman at the George Washington University Law School.

  • How High Court Approached Time Limit On Reg Challenges

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's decision in Corner Post v. Federal Reserve Board effectively gives new entities their own personal statute of limitations to challenge rules and regulations, and Justice Brett Kavanaugh's concurrence may portend the court's view that those entities do not need to be directly regulated, say attorneys at Snell & Wilmer.

  • How To Clean Up Your Generative AI-Produced Legal Drafts

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    As law firms increasingly rely on generative artificial intelligence tools to produce legal text, attorneys should be on guard for the overuse of cohesive devices in initial drafts, and consider a few editing pointers to clean up AI’s repetitive and choppy outputs, says Ivy Grey at WordRake.

  • Series

    Boxing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Boxing has influenced my legal work by enabling me to confidently hone the skills I've learned from the sport, like the ability to remain calm under pressure, evaluate an opponent's weaknesses and recognize when to seize an important opportunity, says Kirsten Soto at Clyde & Co.

  • Fed. Circ. Percipient Gov't Contract Ruling Is Groundbreaking

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    The effects of the Federal Circuit's decision last month in Percipient.ai v. U.S. may be limited to commercial product and service suppliers, but it is significant for government procurement in opening the door to protests by suppliers who previously would have lacked standing and Court of Federal Claims jurisdiction, say attorneys at Haynes Boone.

  • Opinion

    Industry Self-Regulation Will Shine Post-Chevron

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's Loper decision will shape the contours of industry self-regulation in the years to come, providing opportunities for this often-misunderstood practice, says Eric Reicin at BBB National Programs.

  • 3 Ways Agencies Will Keep Making Law After Chevron

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    The U.S. Supreme Court clearly thinks it has done something big in overturning the Chevron precedent that had given deference to agencies' statutory interpretations, but regulated parties have to consider how agencies retain significant power to shape the law and its meaning, say attorneys at K&L Gates.

  • Opinion

    Atty Well-Being Efforts Ignore Root Causes Of The Problem

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    The legal industry is engaged in a critical conversation about lawyers' mental health, but current attorney well-being programs primarily focus on helping lawyers cope with the stress of excessive workloads, instead of examining whether this work culture is even fundamentally compatible with lawyer well-being, says Jonathan Baum at Avenir Guild.

  • Contract Disputes Recap: Addressing Dispositive Motions

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    Stephanie Magnell and Bret Marfut at Seyfarth examine three recent decisions from the U.S. Court of Claims and the U.S. Civilian Board of Contract Appeals that provide interesting takeaways about the nuances of motion practice utilized by the government to dispose of cases brought under the Contract Disputes Act prior to substantive litigation

  • Series

    Skiing And Surfing Make Me A Better Lawyer

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    The skills I’ve learned while riding waves in the ocean and slopes in the mountains have translated to my legal career — developing strong mentor relationships, remaining calm in difficult situations, and being prepared and able to move to a backup plan when needed, says Brian Claassen at Knobbe Martens.

  • Unpacking The Circuit Split Over A Federal Atty Fee Rule

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    Federal circuit courts that have addressed Rule 41(d) of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure are split as to whether attorney fees are included as part of the costs of a previously dismissed action, so practitioners aiming to recover or avoid fees should tailor arguments to the appropriate court, says Joseph Myles and Lionel Lavenue at Finnegan.

  • 4 Steps To Repair Defense Credibility In Opening Statements

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    Given the continued rise of record-breaking verdicts, defense counsel need to consider fresh approaches to counteract the factors coloring juror attitudes — starting with a formula for rebuilding credibility at the very beginning of opening statements, says Ken Broda-Bahm at Persuasion Strategies.

  • Bid Protest Spotlight: Mapping, Jurisdiction, Incumbency

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    In this month's bid protest roundup, Nicole Giles and Ethan Sterenfeld at MoFo discuss a decision from the U.S. Court of Federal Claims and two from the U.S. Government Accountability Office, which highlight how labor mapping, jurisdiction questions and incumbency bias can affect outcomes.

  • After A Brief Hiccup, The 'Rocket Docket' Soars Back To No. 1

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    The Eastern District of Virginia’s precipitous 2022 fall from its storied rocket docket status appears to have been a temporary aberration, as recent statistics reveal that the court is once again back on top as the fastest federal civil trial court in the nation, says Robert Tata at Hunton.

  • Recruitment Trends In Emerging Law Firm Frontiers

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    BigLaw firms are facing local recruitment challenges as they increasingly establish offices in cities outside of the major legal hubs, requiring them to weigh various strategies for attracting talent that present different risks and benefits, says Tom Hanlon at Buchanan Law.

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