Employment

  • July 01, 2024

    Wash. Hospital To Pay $1.4M To End Meal Break Wage Suit

    A Washington hospital agreed to shell out $1.4 million to end a lawsuit claiming employees worked through meal breaks without pay, with a medical coder urging a federal court to sign off on the settlement covering about 1,350 workers.

  • July 01, 2024

    AbbVie Hit With Age, Gender Bias Suit By Former Salesman

    AbbVie Inc. fired a regional sales director as a pretext to avoid paying him for stock options and because of retaliatory complaints by two women who had received poor performance reviews, according to a suit filed in Massachusetts state court.

  • July 01, 2024

    8th Circ. Reverses Sanctions On Ark. Firm Over Fee Award

    The Eighth Circuit has reversed a district court's sanction barring a law firm from participating in Fair Labor Standards Act lawsuits in the Eastern District of Arkansas over reported violations of the rules of civil procedure.

  • July 01, 2024

    DOL Overtime Exemptions Rule 'Likely Unlawful,' Judge Says

    A U.S. Department of Labor rule that took effect Monday and raises the salary thresholds for overtime exemptions won't apply to the state of Texas for now, a Texas federal judge said, finding that the rule "is likely unlawful."

  • July 01, 2024

    Supreme Court Widens Window To Challenge Federal Regs

    Legal challenges to federal regulations can be brought outside the normal statute of limitations if someone isn't adversely affected until after the six-year window of time to file suit, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday.

  • June 28, 2024

    Chevron's End Is Just The Start For Energized Agency Foes

    By knocking down a powerful precedent that has towered over administrative law for 40 years, the U.S. Supreme Court's right wing Friday gave a crowning achievement to anti-agency attorneys. But for those attorneys, the achievement is merely a means to an end, and experts expect a litigation blitzkrieg to materialize quickly in the aftermath.

  • June 28, 2024

    Citi Wants Termination Suit Over Alleged Lies To OCC Tossed

    Citibank has urged a New York federal judge to toss a suit by a former managing director of the bank who claims she was fired for not reporting false information to compliance authorities, arguing that even if her claims are true, she hasn't plausibly alleged a cause of action under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act.

  • June 28, 2024

    In Chevron Case, Justices Trade One Unknown For Another

    The U.S. Supreme Court's decision to overrule a decades-old judicial deference doctrine may cause the "eternal fog of uncertainty" surrounding federal agency actions to dissipate and level the playing field in challenges of government policies, but lawyers warn it raises new questions over what rules courts must follow and how judges will implement them.

  • June 28, 2024

    Employment Authority: The DOL Under Project 2025

    Law360 Employment Authority covers the biggest employment cases and trends. Catch up this week with coverage on how an architect of a conservative think tank's plan for "the next conservative administration" believes the vision will shape the U.S. Department of Labor, why experts say diversity initiatives are bouncing back after taking a hit following the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling on affirmative action and why the nomination of President Biden's National Labor Relations Board chair is facing angst from management advocates as the election approaches.

  • June 28, 2024

    PAGA Reforms Clear Calif. Assembly, Head To Newsom's Desk

    California legislators in both the Senate and Assembly overwhelmingly backed big changes to California's Private Attorneys General Act, including an adjustment to how penalties are assessed to employers and awarded to employees, sending the package to Gov. Gavin Newsom's desk.

  • June 28, 2024

    Texas Justices Back Union Leave Clause's Constitutionality

    A clause in a firefighters union's collective bargaining agreement that permits taking paid leave for negotiations does not violate the Lone Star state's constitution, the Texas Supreme Court ruled Friday while reversing an award of attorney fees and sanctions against some of the plaintiffs.

  • June 28, 2024

    Knicks-Raptors Clash Belongs In Arbitration, Judge Rules

    The dispute between the New York Knicks and Toronto Raptors over an employee jumping from one franchise to another belongs in arbitration before the NBA commissioner, a Manhattan federal judge ruled on Friday, calling the Knicks' efforts to keep it in court instead "an airball.''

  • June 28, 2024

    Bitcoin Device Seller Sues Ex-CEO, Alleging $5.3M Fraud

    A California-based crypto mining-farm builder and equipment seller has sued its former CEO in California federal court, alleging that he embezzled roughly $5.3 million, leading to the company's failure to pay multiple vendors in a timely manner.

  • June 28, 2024

    4th Circ. Backs Bank's Win In Black Worker's Bias Suit

    The Fourth Circuit on Friday declined to reinstate a lawsuit that a Black former manager brought against a bank accusing it of firing her because she complained about racial bias, saying she failed to rebut the company's argument that she was let go because of her poor performance.

  • June 28, 2024

    Fired BlueCross Worker Gets $680K Jury Win In Vax Bias Suit

    A Tennessee federal jury awarded a former BlueCross BlueShield employee more than $680,000 after it found the insurance company failed to accommodate her when she was fired for refusing its COVID-19 vaccination mandate because of her religious convictions.

  • June 28, 2024

    Northwestern Releases Paul Weiss Report On Hazing Review

    Northwestern University has made public a long-awaited report by former U.S. attorney general and current Paul Weiss Rifkind Wharton & Garrison LLP partner Loretta Lynch finding weaknesses in the school's systems and culture.

  • June 28, 2024

    Co. Cites High Court's SEC Ruling To Fight Labor Board Case

    Claims that an oil pipeline operator wrongfully fired an employee should go before a jury, not the National Labor Relations Board, the company argued in a new lawsuit in Texas federal court, citing the U.S. Supreme Court's rebuke of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's in-house court.

  • June 28, 2024

    NYC Realty Co. Defeats Most Of Building Super's Wage Claims

    A New York realty group secured early wins on all but one of a building superintendent's wage claims, with a New York federal judge ruling Friday the worker had provided scant evidence in support, but the group must face claims related to wage deficits caused by a time clock malfunction.

  • June 28, 2024

    Uber Driver Axes Coverage Claims Against Co.'s Insurer

    An Uber driver agreed to dismiss his claims against an insurer for Uber after he filed a suit in Massachusetts federal court accusing it and the ride-hailing company of wrongly refusing to offer him underinsured motorist coverage after he said he was severely injured in an accident.

  • June 28, 2024

    9th Circ. Backs Mining Co.'s Defeat Of Driver's FMLA Suit

    The Ninth Circuit upheld a mining company's jury win over a truck driver's lawsuit claiming he was fired because he took time off after a workplace injury, saying Friday that employers don't have to rely on medical evidence to challenge a doctor's diagnosis under federal medical leave law.

  • June 28, 2024

    Nationwide Cert. Rejected In Suit Over Stolen Curaleaf Tips

    An Illinois federal judge conditionally certified a class of Curaleaf hourly employees in Illinois, Arizona and Massachusetts, but denied a bid to certify a nationwide class of all Curaleaf hourly employees "based on pure speculation," in a suit alleging managers at its cannabis dispensary locations around the country stole the contents of tip jars.

  • June 28, 2024

    Tesla Laid Off 14K Workers Without Notice, WARN Suit Says

    Tesla Inc. laid off approximately 14,000 employees without giving them a fair warning required under both federal and California law, a former parts advisor alleges in a putative class action seeking back pay and penalties on the automotive company.

  • June 28, 2024

    Eric Trump Can Shield Most Docs In Ex-Aide's Retaliation Suit

    Eric Trump can assert attorney-client privilege to avoid turning over most of a batch of emails sought by Trump 2016 campaign aide Arlene "AJ" Delgado in her pregnancy retaliation suit claiming she was banished from former President Donald Trump's orbit after a fellow staffer got her pregnant.

  • June 28, 2024

    Off The Bench: NFL's Big Loss In Court, NBA Agent Spat

    In this week's Off The Bench, a jury delivers the NFL a $4.7 billion punch to the gut, an NBA agent looks to get paid for work that was credited to Rich Paul, and the Arizona Cardinals try to get a former executive's defamation claims sent to arbitration.

  • June 28, 2024

    Morgan Lewis Employment Litigator Jumps To Vedder Price

    Vedder Price has hired an employment litigator from Morgan Lewis & Bockius LLP as a shareholder in its Chicago office, the firm announced Friday.

Expert Analysis

  • EEOC Case Reminds That Men Can Also Claim Pay Bias

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    The Maryland State Highway Administration recently settled U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission claims that a male employee was paid less than his female colleagues, highlighting why employers should not focus on a particular protected class when it comes to assessing pay bias risk, say Barbara Grandjean and Audrey Merkel at Husch Blackwell.

  • 3 Litigation Strategies To Combat 'Safetyism'

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    Amid the rise of safetyism — the idea that every person should be free from the risk of harm or discomfort — among jurors and even judges, defense counsel can mount several tactics from the very start of litigation to counteract these views and blunt the potential for jackpot damages, says Ann Marie Duffy at Hollingsworth.

  • Takeaways From NLRB Advice On 'Outside' Employment

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    Rebecca Leaf at Miles & Stockbridge examines a recent memo from the National Labor Relations Board’s Division of Advice that said it’s unlawful for employers to restrict secondary or outside employment, and explains what companies should know about the use of certain restrictive covenants going forward.

  • What Recent Study Shows About AI's Promise For Legal Tasks

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    Amid both skepticism and excitement about the promise of generative artificial intelligence in legal contexts, the first randomized controlled trial studying its impact on basic lawyering tasks shows mixed but promising results, and underscores the need for attorneys to proactively engage with AI, says Daniel Schwarcz at University of Minnesota Law School.

  • Shaping Speech Policies After NLRB's BLM Protest Ruling

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    After the National Labor Relations Board decided last month that a Home Depot employee was protected by federal labor law when they wore a Black Lives Matter slogan on their apron, employers should consider four questions in order to mitigate legal risks associated with workplace political speech policies, say Louis Cannon and Cassandra Horton at Baker Donelson.

  • What To Know About Employee Retention Credit Disclosures

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    Employers that filed potentially erroneous employee retention credit claims should take certain steps to determine whether the IRS’ voluntary disclosure program is a good fit and, if so, prepare a strong application before the window closes on March 22, say attorneys at Dentons.

  • 2026 World Cup: Companies Face Labor Challenges And More

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    Companies sponsoring or otherwise involved with the 2026 FIFA World Cup — hosted jointly by the U.S., Canada and Mexico — should be proactive in preparing to navigate many legal considerations in immigration, labor management and multijurisdictional workforces surrounding the event, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • 5 Things Trial Attorneys Can Learn From Good Teachers

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    Jennifer Cuculich at IMS Legal Strategies recounts lessons she learned during her time as a math teacher that can help trial attorneys connect with jurors, from the importance of framing core issues to the incorporation of different learning styles.

  • Avoiding Jurisdictional Risks From Execs' Remote Work

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    Following a California federal court's recent decision in Evans v. Cardlytics — where the case was remanded to state court because the company’s executives worked remotely in California — there are several steps employers can take to ensure they will not be exposed to unfavored jurisdictions, says Eric Fox at Quarles & Brady.

  • 11th Circ. FMLA Ruling Deepens Divide Over Causation

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    The Eleventh Circuit's recent ruling in Lapham v. Walgreen distinguishes the circuit as the loudest advocate for the but-for causation standard for assessing Family and Medical Leave Act retaliation claims, though employers in other jurisdictions may encounter less favorable standards and the U.S. Supreme Court will likely have to address the circuit split eventually, say attorneys at Benesch.

  • What Workplace Violence Law Means For Texas Healthcare

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    While no federal laws address violence against healthcare workers, Texas has recently enacted statutory protections that take effect later this year — so facilities in the state should understand their new obligations under the law, and employers in other states would be wise to take notice as well, say attorneys at Bradley Arant.

  • Handling Neurodivergence As The Basis Of Disability Claims

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    Three recent discrimination claims in Rhode Island and New Jersey show how allegations of adverse treatment of neurodivergent individuals will continue to be tested in court, so employers should create an environment that welcomes the disclosure of such conditions, says Ting Cheung at Sanford Heisler.

  • Employers Should Take Surgeon's Sex Bias Suit As A Warning

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    A Philadelphia federal jury's recent verdict in a sex bias suit over Thomas Jefferson University's inaction on a male plaintiff's sexual harassment complaint is a reminder to employers of all stripes about the importance of consistently applied protocols for handling complaints, say attorneys at Williams & Connolly.

  • Litigation Inspiration: A Source Of Untapped Fulfillment

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    As increasing numbers of attorneys struggle with stress and mental health issues, business litigators can find protection against burnout by remembering their important role in society — because fulfillment in one’s work isn’t just reserved for public interest lawyers, say Bennett Rawicki and Peter Bigelow at Hilgers Graben.

  • Generative AI Adds Risk To Employee 'Self-Help' Discovery

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    Plaintiffs have long engaged in their own evidence gathering for claims against current or former employers, but as more companies implement generative AI tools, both the potential scope and the potential risks of such "self-help" discovery are rising quickly, says Nick Peterson at Wiley.

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