Sports & Betting

  • March 20, 2024

    NJ Town Exits Eagles Fan's Battery Suit Over QB's Football

    A Philadelphia Eagles fan has dropped the town of East Rutherford, New Jersey, from his suit claiming he was battered at MetLife Stadium after quarterback Jalen Hurts gave him a game ball, but the other defendants are still on the hook, according to court documents.

  • March 20, 2024

    Slaughter And May Cuts Partner Promotions By Half In 2024

    Slaughter and May said on Wednesday that it is adding to its bench of up-and-coming leaders by promoting five lawyers to its partnership — only half the number it elevated in 2023.

  • March 20, 2024

    New York Red Bulls GC Now Also Soccer Team's HR Chief

    The general counsel of the New York Red Bulls has been promoted to also serve as chief administrative officer of the Major League Soccer team, which plays its home games in New Jersey, the team announced this week.

  • March 20, 2024

    Law360 Announces The Members Of Its 2024 Editorial Boards

    Law360 is pleased to announce the formation of its 2024 Editorial Advisory Boards.

  • March 20, 2024

    11th Circ. Wage Ruling Highlights Volunteer Benefit Pitfalls

    An Eleventh Circuit ruling that a public agency operating golf courses did not owe a proposed class of golf attendants wages because they were not employees shows that clarity is needed when enlisting volunteers, attorneys said. Here, Law360 explores the issue.

  • March 20, 2024

    Fight Over NFL Star's Statue Hinges On Who Holds Copyright

    The works of sculptors, like those of other artists, are protected by the fair use doctrine in U.S. copyright law, while photographers also have copyright protection for their work when others try to use it for their own profit. The intersection of those rights complicates a rare copyright infringement suit against the NFL and the Detroit Lions over a statue of Hall of Fame player Barry Sanders, experts say.

  • March 20, 2024

    US Chamber's Litigation Funding Concerns Spur 2 State Laws

    Amid concerns from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce about third-party litigation funding, including from potentially hostile foreign entities, state legislatures in Indiana and West Virginia have recently passed bills imposing restrictions on the practice.

  • March 19, 2024

    Activision, Rockstar Sued Over Addictive Video Games

    Activision Blizzard Inc., Rockstar Games Inc., Epic Games Inc. and other major video game developers have been sued in Arkansas federal court over allegations that popular titles like Fortnite and Call of Duty are addictive by design and ruined the life of a 14-year-old child.

  • March 19, 2024

    Bettors' Appeal Over Doped Derby Horse Heard By 6th Circ.

    Bettors on the 2021 Kentucky Derby who did not bet on winner Medina Spirit can't claim negligence or damages in court, even though the horse was later disqualified for failing a drug test, an attorney for Churchill Downs told a Sixth Circuit panel on Tuesday.

  • March 19, 2024

    NBA Fraudster Dodges Prison After Cooperation, Testimony

    A former NBA shooting guard avoided prison Tuesday for participating in a $5 million retiree healthcare fraud scheme after Manhattan federal prosecutors lauded his assistance and testimony at a trial this past fall.

  • March 19, 2024

    Clemson Sues Over 'Unconscionable' Fees To Exit ACC

    Clemson University on Tuesday sued the Atlantic Coast Conference in South Carolina state court, alleging that the conference is hindering its ability to explore alternative options regarding conference membership because it claims member institutions must pay an "unconscionable and unenforceable" $140 million to leave the conference.

  • March 19, 2024

    Jackpocket App Co. Leaves 2nd Circ. Empty-Handed

    A lottery startup called Jackpocket Inc. that DraftKings Inc. bought last month has failed to persuade the Second Circuit to disturb a ruling out of a New York federal court that rejected its trademark case against a newer U.K. rival that operates a website called Jackpot.com.

  • March 19, 2024

    NCAA Hit With Putative Action Challenging Prize Money Rule

    The NCAA is facing yet another legal challenge over its limits on athlete compensation, as a proposed class action in North Carolina looks to knock down the association's rules barring players from collecting prize money in outside competitions.

  • March 18, 2024

    Judge Trims ADA Claims From Disney Worker's Vaccine Suit

    A Florida federal judge ruled Monday that a Disney employee fired for failing to comply with COVID-19 procedures cannot bring claims under the Americans with Disabilities Act because the law does not cover potential future disabilities, like the risk of infection from not being vaccinated.

  • March 18, 2024

    Dartmouth College Won't Bargain With Men's Basketball Team

    Dartmouth College is rejecting a bid by a Service Employees International Union local to bargain for a contract covering men's basketball players, a university spokesperson said Monday, signaling the school's plan to take to federal court its fight over whether collegiate athletes are statutory employees.

  • March 18, 2024

    Justices Tilt Toward NRA In Free Speech Row With Regulator

    A cautious U.S. Supreme Court seemed poised Monday to rule in favor of the National Rifle Association in a case over allegations that a former New York state official pressured financial institutions to cut ties to the National Rifle Association in violation of its free speech rights.

  • March 18, 2024

    Voyager Investors Suing Mark Cuban Seek Class Cert.

    Investors suing billionaire Mark Cuban over his role in promoting now-bankrupt Voyager Digital Ltd. have pushed for class certification and urged the court to rule that Voyager was selling unregistered securities.

  • March 18, 2024

    Son Of Late Football Player With Brain Condition Sues NCAA

    The son of a former college football player who died in 2018 and was later diagnosed with chronic traumatic encephalopathy sued the NCAA Monday in Indianapolis federal court, accusing it of negligence and wrongful death for knowing about the risks to players' health during the 1960s but ignoring them.

  • March 18, 2024

    11th Circ. Urged To Nix Ala. Coach's Win In Gender Bias Suit

    Alabama State University has urged the Eleventh Circuit to reverse a win for the school's former softball coach, who claimed she was suspended because of her gender, saying she did not demonstrate a case of bias.

  • March 18, 2024

    Minute Media Buys Rights To Publish Sports Illustrated

    Digital content business Minute Media has purchased the publishing rights for Sports Illustrated, keeping alive a longtime brand that recently obliterated its newsroom with layoffs and shut down its betting platform, according to a Monday announcement.

  • March 18, 2024

    Feds, Tribes, Casinos Face Off Over Trust Land Request

    The Interior Department, Detroit-area casinos and two tribes are urging the D.C. Circuit to reject the Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians' bid to compel the federal government to take land into trust for a casino venture several hundred miles away from its other trust lands on Michigan's Upper Peninsula.

  • March 18, 2024

    Tennis Job No Reason To Slice 'Varsity Blues' Term, Feds Say

    A tennis instructor job in New York is no reason to grant an early end to the home confinement portion of a sentence given to a former Georgetown University coach for his role in the "Varsity Blues" college admissions scandal, prosecutors told a Massachusetts federal judge Monday.

  • March 18, 2024

    World Champ Race Walker's Appeal Of Doping Ban Denied

    The ban against an Italian champion race walker will remain in place after an international arbitration tribunal denied the Olympic gold medalist's appeal of an eight-year punishment over alleged doping violations, according to a Friday statement.

  • March 18, 2024

    Doctor Can't Yank NBA Fraud Plea, Feds Insist

    Prosecutors have told a Manhattan federal judge that a doctor accused of assisting a group of NBA players in creating false documents to defraud the league's healthcare plan shouldn't be allowed to yank his guilty plea, arguing evidence shows his guilt and that too much time has passed.

  • March 18, 2024

    Proskauer Guides $58M Sale Of Seattle Reign NWSL Team

    The National Women's Soccer League's Seattle Reign FC will fall under new ownership as a group including men's soccer franchise Seattle Sounders FC and private equity giant Carlyle announced plans to buy the women's team in a deal that values it at $58 million.

Expert Analysis

  • General Counsel Need Data Literacy To Keep Up With AI

    Author Photo

    With the rise of accessible and powerful generative artificial intelligence solutions, it is imperative for general counsel to understand the use and application of data for myriad important activities, from evaluating the e-discovery process to monitoring compliance analytics and more, says Colin Levy at Malbek.

  • Navigating Discovery Of Generative AI Information

    Author Photo

    As generative artificial intelligence tools become increasingly ubiquitous, companies must make sure to preserve generative AI data when there is reasonable expectation of litigation, and to include transcripts in litigation hold notices, as they may be relevant to discovery requests, say Nick Peterson and Corey Hauser at Wiley.

  • Finding Focus: Strategies For Attorneys With ADHD

    Author Photo

    Given the prevalence of ADHD among attorneys, it is imperative that the legal community gain a better understanding of how ADHD affects well-being, and that resources and strategies exist for attorneys with this disability to manage their symptoms and achieve success, say Casey Dixon at Dixon Life Coaching and Krista Larson at Stinson.

  • A Look At DOJ's New Nationwide Investment Fraud Approach

    Author Photo

    Investment fraud charges are increasingly being brought in unlikely venues across the country, and the rationale behind the U.S. Department of Justice's approach could well be the heightened legal standards in connection with prosecuting investment fraud, says Jonathan Porter at Husch Blackwell.

  • 7 NIL Considerations For Brand Deals With Student-Athletes

    Author Photo

    While the constantly changing laws, rules and regulations for name, image and likeness in collegiate athletics are difficult to navigate, the benefits of a brand's successful NIL marketing campaign can outweigh the challenge of traversing this complex framework, say attorneys at Arnold & Porter.

  • Attorneys, Law Schools Must Adapt To New Era Of Evidence

    Author Photo

    Technological advancements mean more direct evidence is being created than ever before, and attorneys as well as law schools must modify their methods to account for new challenges in how this evidence is collected and used to try cases, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • Knicks Suit Shows Need For Leagues To Protect Big Data

    Author Photo

    The New York Knicks' recent lawsuit alleging a former employee took trade secrets to the Toronto Raptors shows sports leagues — both professional and amateur — should prepare for future litigation in this realm, given the growth of analytics and statistics in front offices, says Kevin Paule at Hill Ward Henderson.

  • Series

    ESG Around The World: The UK

    Author Photo

    Following Brexit, the U.K. has adopted a different approach to regulating environmental, social and governance factors from the European Union — an approach that focuses on climate disclosures by U.K.-regulated entities, while steering clear of the more ambitious objectives pursued by the EU, say attorneys at Dechert.

  • Why 7th Circ. Libel Ruling Is Crucial For The Media

    Author Photo

    As more defamation plaintiffs attorneys argue that allowing a published statement to remain online after additional evidence of falsity emerges equates to actual malice, the Seventh Circuit's recent National Police Association v. Gannett opinion should be lauded by the media and online publishers as a favorable decision, say attorneys at Vedder Price.

  • Tips For Litigating Against Pro Se Parties In Complex Disputes

    Author Photo

    Litigating against self-represented parties in complex cases can pose unique challenges for attorneys, but for the most part, it requires the same skills that are useful in other cases — from documenting everything to understanding one’s ethical duties, says Bryan Ketroser at Alto Litigation.

  • Pro Bono Work Is Powerful Self-Help For Attorneys

    Author Photo

    Oct. 22-28 is Pro Bono Week, serving as a useful reminder that offering free legal help to the public can help attorneys expand their legal toolbox, forge community relationships and create human connections, despite the challenges of this kind of work, says Orlando Lopez at Culhane Meadows.

  • Diamond Sports Cases Shed Light On Executory Contracts

    Author Photo

    Recent Texas bankruptcy cases involving telecast fees payable by Diamond Sports to certain Major League Baseball teams provide a window into the dynamic relationship that can develop between debtors and counterparties under some executory contracts, say Joseph Badtke-Berkow and Robin Spigel at Allen & Overy.

  • Series

    Playing In A Rock Cover Band Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    Performing in a classic rock cover band has driven me to hone several skills — including focus, organization and networking — that have benefited my professional development, demonstrating that taking time to follow your muse outside of work can be a boon to your career, says Michael Gambro at Cadwalader.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Espinosa On 'Lincoln Lawyer'

    Author Photo

    The murder trials in Netflix’s “The Lincoln Lawyer” illustrate the stark contrast between the ethical high ground that fosters and maintains the criminal justice system's integrity, and the ethical abyss that can undermine it, with an important reminder for all legal practitioners, say Judge Adam Espinosa and Andrew Howard at the Colorado 2nd Judicial District Court.

  • Opinion

    Newman Suspension Shows Need For Judicial Reform

    Author Photo

    The recent suspension of U.S. Circuit Judge Pauline Newman following her alleged refusal to participate in a disability inquiry reveals the need for judicial misconduct reforms to ensure that judges step down when they can no longer serve effectively, says Aliza Shatzman at The Legal Accountability Project.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the Sports & Betting archive.
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!